Presentations and other Documents from this workshop are found here.

The goal of this workshop was to explore potential linkages between regional land use planning and cumulative effects management in order to support sustainable development initiatives:


1. What are the key components of the Yukon regional land use planning process?

2. What linkages currently exist or could be established to improve management of cumulative effects?

3. How can regional land use plans be developed to incorporate effective strategies to manage cumulative effects?

Background

In Yukon, it is becoming increasingly evident that the development of regional land use plans may be a necessary step towards the effective assessment and management of cumulative effects. Currently, the regional land use planning process is one of the few multi-stakeholder activities that can effectively incorporate cumulative effects management concepts and strategies within large geographic regions. While this is generally recognized, the appropriate organizational linkages and implementation framework may not yet be in place.

Two previous DIAND Environment Directorate-sponsored cumulative effects workshops explored cumulative effects assessment and management strategies. A major outcome of these previous workshops was recognition of the necessary linkage between cumulative effects strategies and regional land use plans. The two processes have many elements in common. Regional land use planning is an inclusive process that attempts to balance a broad range of interests within a defined geographic area; this requires input, collaboration and values assessment between multiple agencies, stakeholders and interest groups. The assessment and management of cumulative effects requires collaboration and communication between a similar group of diverse interests and regulatory agencies, and must also consider regional perspectives. Given the current Yukon regulatory and policy framework, regional land use planning may be one of the best mechanisms to proactively manage cumulative effects through the incorporation of a variety of tools and approaches including land designation systems, the use of ecological thresholds, adoption of integrated resource management principles and the development of explicit future landscape goals and management objectives with well defined monitoring strategies.


Yukon Land Use Planning Council
and
Environment Directorate, Northern Affairs Program (DIAND), Yukon Region

 

co-present a workshop:

 

 

Regional Land Use Planning and Cumulative Effects Management: Linkages and Applications

 

 

10 . 11 February 2003

High Country Inn

Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada

 

 

 

 

FINAL PROGRAM AND AGENDA

 

 

 

 

 

YLUPC Logo

 

INACCanada


Regional Land Use Planning and Cumulative Effects Management: Linkages and Applications

 

Workshop Overview

The Yukon Land Use Planning Council and Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Environment Directorate, are presenting a workshop entitled 'Regional Land Use Planning and Cumulative Effects Management: Linkages and Applications' at the High Country Inn, Whitehorse on February 10-11, 2003. The goal of this workshop is to explore potential linkages between regional land use planning and cumulative effects management in order to support sustainable development initiatives. Questions this workshop will focus on include:

1. What are the key components of the Yukon regional land use planning process?

2. What linkages currently exist or could be established to improve management of cumulative effects?

3. How can regional land use plans be developed to incorporate effective strategies to manage cumulative effects?

In Yukon, it is becoming increasingly evident that the development of regional land use plans may be a necessary step towards the effective assessment and management of cumulative effects. Currently, the regional land use planning process is one of the few multi-stakeholder activities that can effectively incorporate cumulative effects management concepts and strategies within large geographic regions. While this is generally recognized, the appropriate organizational linkages and implementation framework may not yet be in place.

Two previous DIAND Environment Directorate-sponsored cumulative effects workshops explored cumulative effects assessment and management strategies. A major outcome of these previous workshops was recognition of the necessary linkage between cumulative effects strategies and regional land use plans. The two processes have many elements in common. Regional land use planning is an inclusive process that attempts to balance a broad range of interests within a defined geographic area; this requires input, collaboration and values assessment between multiple agencies, stakeholders and interest groups. The assessment and management of cumulative effects requires collaboration and communication between a similar group of diverse interests and regulatory agencies, and must also consider regional perspectives. Given the current Yukon regulatory and policy framework, regional land use planning may be one of the best mechanisms to proactively manage cumulative effects through the incorporation of a variety of tools and approaches including land designation systems, the use of ecological thresholds, adoption of integrated resource management principles and the development of explicit future landscape goals and management objectives with well defined monitoring strategies.


Presenters

Experts will present and discuss a wide range of topics relating to land use planning and cumulative effects assessment and management. The primary workshop theme will be the integration of these two topics through the use of appropriate management tools and frameworks. Invited speakers have experience from a variety of industry, government and academic sectors and from different geographic regions. Whenever possible, presenters will discuss real-world examples to illustrate topics. A panel discussion involving local industry and resource managers will also serve to focus discussion on existing Yukon issues. We expect that these presentations and the following discussions will have immediate practical relevance to Yukon. Backgrounds of the speakers and short descriptions of their presentations are described below.

 

 

Who Should Attend

Anyone interested in regional land use planning and the management of natural resources in Yukon is encouraged to attend this workshop. The material will be most relevant for industry, consultants, government and regulatory reviewers, First Nation governments and people professionally interested in the management of natural resources in Yukon.

 

Yukon Context

The Yukon is at a pivotal moment with respect to opportunities for regional land use planning:

· Many First Nation land claims have been settled and are being implemented, initiating the regional planning process;

· Federal responsibilities are devolving to the Territorial Government, allowing land use decisions to be made locally;

· There is continued interest in the natural resources of the Yukon such as timber, oil and gas and protected areas, all occurring within an economy that has historically been dominated by mining and tourism, and;

· Interest in an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline continues and discussions surrounding an international railway through the Yukon from Alaska to BC have been initiated.

With this increasing change comes the opportunity to incorporate regional land use plans into future decision making, and also for them to be used as a mechanism to manage potential cumulative effects. Developing appropriate linkages and frameworks for environmental assessment will be critical to the facilitation of this goal.

 

 


Program Outline

Presentations will range from .real world. regional planning experiences and cumulative effects management strategies to more conceptual approaches on both topics. The key program theme will be the integration of cumulative effects and sustainable development strategies within a regional land use planning context. Time for questions and answers and small group discussions will follow each presentation. The format for both days is a series of presentations by invited speakers followed by time for questions and discussion. On the second day, a one hour panel discussion by Yukon resource managers and industry representatives will be followed by focused break-out group discussion, allowing practical tools and issues to be discussed using Yukon examples. Both days will include refreshment breaks and lunch at the High Country Inn. A workshop summary report will be prepared following the workshop and distributed to participants.

 

Registration

Register by January 31, 2003 and SAVE!

An early registration fee of $133.75 (including GST) includes admission to the two-day workshop, and lunch and refreshments on both days. A late registration fee of $214.00 (including GST) will be charged on all registrations received after January 31, 2003.

Payment should be made in full by credit card (Mastercard), cheque or money order payable to "Conventions North". Receipts will be issued for all registration fees paid. Mail payments to: Conventions North c/o Deb Ryan, 410 Hawkins Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1X8, Phone: (867) 667-4943, Fax: (867) 667-4940, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

** Registration packages and forms are available in PDF format on the Yukon Land Use Planning Council website at

www.planyukon.ca

 


Detailed Agenda (subject to changes)

DAY 1

Monday, February 10, 2003

7:30am . 8:30

Late Registration

8:30am . 8:50

Welcoming Remarks and Opening Introduction

Opening Prayer and Welcome. Councilor Lesley Smith, Kwanlin Dun First Nation

Workshop Chair and Moderator

Bill Klassen, W.J. Klassen and Associates Ltd., Whitehorse, Yukon

Lead Facilitator, Lyn Hartley, Policy Analyst, Environment Directorate, DIAND, Whitehorse, Yukon

Introduction and Welcome. Lesley Cabott, Yukon Land Use Planning Council, Whitehorse, Yukon

8:50 . 10:15

Keynote Presentation:

Land Use Planning in British Columbia: 10-Years of Solving Wicked

Problems

Kevin Kriese, Government of British Columbia, Sustainable Resource Management, Skeena Region, Smithers, BC

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

10:15 . 10:30

Break

 

SESSION ONE: INFORMATION SESSION

10:30 . 11:45

Land Use Planning in Yukon

Ron Cruikshank, Yukon Land Use Planning Council, Whitehorse, Yukon and

Bonnie Hurlock, Teslin Regional Planning Commission, Teslin, Yukon

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

11:45 . 12:45

Lunch at High Country Inn

12:45 . 2:00

Cumulative Effects in Yukon

Rob Walker, DIAND Environment Directorate, Whitehorse, Yukon

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

 

SESSION TWO: INTEGRATION . CONCEPTS and EXAMPLES

2:00 . 3:15

Principles and Concepts of Regional Land Use Planning

Dr. Frank Duerden, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

3:15 . 3:30

Break

3:30 . 4:45

Managing Cumulative Effects through Regional Land Use Planning: A Practical Framework

George Hegmann, AXYS Environmental Consulting Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

4:45 . 5:00

Wrap-Up

Bill Klassen and Lyn Hartley


 

DAY 2

Tuesday, February 11, 2003

8:30 . 8:45

Introduction to Day 2

Bill Klassen and Lyn Hartley

 

SESSION THREE: TOOLS and CASE STUDIES

8:45 . 9:00

Community-Based Cumulative Effects Management . A Grassroots Approach

Heidi Istchenko, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, Yukon Region, Whitehorse, Yukon

- Q/A Period to follow

9:00 . 9:15

Integrated Resource Management . A Yukon Approach

Jesse Duke, Government of Yukon, Energy Mines and Resources, Mineral Planning and Development, Whitehorse, Yukon

- Q/A Period to follow

9:15 . 10:30

Land Use Planning and Integrated Resource Management: Rationale and Challenges for Implementation

Steven Kennett, Canadian Institute of Resources Law, Calgary, Alberta

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

10:30 . 10:45

Break

10:45 . 12:00

Economic Opportunities and Ecological Integrity:

Approaches to Balancing Risk for Resource Managers

Brad Stelfox, Forem Technologies, Bragg Creek, Alberta

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

12:00 . 1:00

Lunch at High Country Inn

1:00 . 2:15

Tough Decisions for Northern Fishermen: You Can.t Have Your Fish and Eat Them, Too

Michael Sullivan, Fish and Wildlife Division, Sustainable Resource Development, Edmonton, Alberta

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

2:15 . 3:30

Tiered Ecological Thresholds: Integrating Land Use Planning and Cumulative Effects Assessment and Management in the Muskwa-Kechika Management Area

Terry Antoniuk, Salmo Consulting Inc., Calgary, Alberta

- Q/A and Discussion Period to follow

3:30 . 3:45

Break

3:45 . 4:45

SESSION FOUR: BREAK-OUT GROUP DISCUSSIONS

Facilitators: Lyn Hartley and Bill Klassen

Discussion Question: Based on what you have heard and discussed over the past two days what advice and recommendations do you have for the YLUPC, Land Use Planning Commissions, and other resource managers in Yukon?

(Discussion - 30 minutes, Reporting - 30 minutes)

4:45 . 4:50

Closing Remarks

Ian Church, Environment Directorate, DIAND, Yukon Region

5:00pm

Workshop Adjourned

     

 

 

Presenters and Talk Descriptions

 

Tiered Ecological Thresholds: Integrating Land Use Planning and Cumulative Effects Assessment and Management in the Muskwa-Kechika Management Area

Terry Antoniuk., Salmo Consulting Inc., Suite 100, 215 . 10 Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2R 0A4, Tel: (403) 266-6363, Fax: (403) 266-6353 , E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Management of cumulative effects is largely focused on defining where and how human activities can be continued without irreversible net harm to the environment. Thresholds (objective, science-based standards) can be used to evaluate the acceptability of both project-specific and cumulative effects. The best examples of thresholds are established air and water quality guidelines. Ecological thresholds that relate to habitat, population, or land use indicators are also being developed, but have not yet been widely applied. Tiered ecological thresholds provide an integrated approach for development and implementation of thresholds. With this approach, science-based and politically defined targets can be integrated with defined management actions so that assessment and management rules are clear for all parties. Tiered thresholds can be directly connected to land use plan objectives . this allows management actions to reflect .acceptable change. as defined in the land use plan. This helps to provide the flexibility necessary for different land management regimes and ecological settings and for the full spectrum of development activities. The tiered ecological threshold approach will be introduced with specific reference to two case studies: a suite of generalized cumulative effects thresholds developed for northeast British Columbia, and species-specific thresholds being developed in the oil sands area of northeast Alberta.

 

Land Use Planning In Yukon

Ron Cruikshank, Director, Yukon Land Use Planning Council, 201-307 Jarvis Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2H3, Tel: (867) 667-7397, Fax: (867) 667-4624, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and

Bonnie Hurlock, Executive Director, Teslin Regional Planning Commission, Box 204, Teslin, Yukon Y0A 1B0, Tel: (867) 390-2105, Fax: (867) 390-2104, Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The first portion of this presentation will provide an overview of the regional planning process established under Chapter 11 of the Umbrella Final Agreement. An update on current planning activities and regions will also be given. A Common Land Use Planning Process (CLUPP) has been developed and documented for Yukon, facilitating some level of commonality for the process in which regional plans may be developed. However, the content of yet-to-be produced regional land use plans has not yet been defined, and will play a critical role in how effective the regional land use plans become. Yukon is at a pivotal moment with respect to opportunities for regional land use planning, largely as a result of First Nations land claim implementation and upcoming federal devolution. A narrow window of opportunity may therefore exist to establish the appropriate frameworks and linkages for regional plans to provide mechanisms for the effective assessment and management of cumulative effects. These approaches are also expected to assist in the streamlining of the regulatory process and provide increased land use certainty for a variety of stakeholders. Current initiatives of the YLUPC to facilitate coordinated and proactive regional land use planning activities will be outlined.

In the second portion of this presentation, the Teslin Regional Planning Commission will present how the Commission will do its work to prepare the regional land use plan. Bonnie Hurlock will speak about the planning program and process approved by the Commission in the "Precise Terms of Reference" (PTOR) developed under Chapter 11 (s. 11.4.52) of the Teslin Tlingit Council Land Claims Agreement. The Mission Statement in the PTOR states "The Teslin Regional Planning Commission will develop a regional land use plan with emphasis on environmental, social and economic sustainability, full public involvement and comply with the Teslin Tlingit Council Final Land Claim and Self-Government Agreements."

 


Principles and Concepts of Regional Land Use Planning

Dr. Frank Duerden, Department of Geography/Program in Geographic Analysis, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5B 2K3, Tel: (416) 979-5000 ext.7240, Fax: (416) 979-5362, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In order to produce a successful regional land-use plan there must be a clear and easily communicated vision of the expected finished product, the way in which it will be produced, and the manner in which it will be used, early in the planning process. Additionally it must be demonstrated that there is a need for planning, and that production of a plan will improve the well-being and prosperity of affected populations. This presentation commences with a review of the rationale for regional land-use planning. It is this rationale that drives the fact that planning is regional in scale and comprehensive in nature and makes the clear link between planning, environment and economic development. A primary role of a regional land-use plan is to reduce uncertainty about the future as much as possible, and to ensure long-term well being. A systematic review of the technical process of plan production will demonstrate the link between the ways plans are developed and these objectives.

 

Integrated Resource Management . A Yukon Approach

Jesse Duke, Director, Government of Yukon, Department of Energy Mines and Resources, Mineral Planning and Development, Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6, Tel: (867) 667-3422, Fax: (867) 393-6232, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Yukon assumes significant new challenges and responsibilities for minerals and other resource management in less than four months. Many of the management structures will be transferred intact and a smooth transition of delivery of services is expected. Other management responsibilities will be responding to new operational environments with new reporting relationships.

Integrated Resource Management (IRM) offers a model to rationalize and coordinate services and assist departments to manage a smooth transition. IRM is a corporate philosophy to guide efficient and effective decision-making in government. Many of the processes and decisions now effectively utilize an IRM approach. A shared understanding of the principles and rationale for IRM will help build support for the continued success of some programs as well as provide context for identifying improvements on an ongoing basis in all program areas.

 


Managing Cumulative Effects through Regional Land Use Planning: A Practical Framework

George Hegmann, AXYS Environmental Consulting Ltd., Suite 300, 805 - 8th AVE SW, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 1H7, Tel: (403) 750-7668, Fax: (403) 269-5245, E-mail:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

The practical role and application of regional land use plans in managing cumulative effects is explored based on case study and evolving practice. Weaknesses and strengths of land use plans to assist the regional assessment and management of cumulative effects is discussed, including the contribution of effects management and thresholds, through the development of a conceptual framework applicable to Yukon. This adopts and evolves the strengths and overcomes the weaknesses of attempts at other similar frameworks in the NWT and Alberta, and planning efforts in the Gwich'in Settlement Area and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. A framework currently under development in northeast British Columbia will be introduced.

AXYS Environmental Consulting has for the last seven years led development in Canada of the understanding and practical implementation of cumulative effects assessment (CEA), including in the Yukon for DIAND, in the NWT for Environment Canada, in the ISR for the Inuvialuit EISC and EIRB.

 

Community-Based Cumulative Effects Management . A Grassroots Approach

Heidi Istchenko, Director, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, Yukon Region, Box 31213, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5P7, Tel: (867) 393-2197, Fax: (867) 393-2198, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This presentation will address three major themes. First, to allow the audience to gain a better understanding of the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) as a non-partisan .service. organization, created by and for the Indigenous peoples in the Yukon River Watershed to assist in their efforts to protect the integrity of the Yukon River Watershed.

 

Second, insight into the relationship of the water and land to the life of northern people, who historically and presently meet their fundamental needs through resources obtained from the land and water will be offered. This dependent relationship is unique to the north, and fosters a strong bond between the land and the people, who are acutely aware of and affected by any changes in their environment. As such, a co-management approach that both respects and includes the participation of communities is integral to the management of cumulative effects.

 

Third, this presentation will provide .real. examples of the variety of community-based efforts currently underway in the Yukon River Watershed communities that are aimed at both understanding and addressing the cumulative effects of resource exploration/extraction and human activity. The role of the YRITWC in assisting the watershed communities in their efforts will also be described.

 

 


Land Use Planning and Integrated Resource Management: Rationale and Challenges for Implementation

Steven A. Kennett, Research Associate, Canadian Institute of Resources Law, MFH 3330 University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Tel: (403) 220-3972, Fax: (403) 282-6182, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This presentation will set the stage for discussion, in subsequent sessions, of the opportunities and challenges for land-use planning in Yukon. In particular, it will focus on planning as an instrument of cumulative effects management and as a key component of an integrated regime for environmental and resource management. It will be divided into three parts.

The first part will summarize the rationale for land-use planning and highlight its pivotal role in integrated resource management (IRM). The general rationale for planning is best illustrated by the urban context, where problems of externalities and cumulative effects make the need for planning virtually self-evident. In non-urban areas where the intensity of human activity is increasing, the emergence of these same problems suggests the need for planning. Evidence of stress within existing decision-making processes provides further evidence of the need for land-use planning. For example, some of the principal limitations of project-specific environmental assessment as a focal point for cumulative effects assessment and management can be traced to the absence of an adequate policy and planning context for decision-making. More generally, cumulative effects management requires an integrated approach to environmental and resource management. Land-use planning is a key integrative mechanism in three respects. First, it is a means of improving integration along the decision-making continuum in resource management by providing guidance for the rights allocation, project review and regulatory stages. Second, land-use planning could promote integration across sectors by defining overarching, landscape-level objectives. Finally, formalized land-use planning could provide an institutional champion for IRM and a mechanism for ensuring that decision-making is integrated across .meaningful time and meaningful space..

The second part of the presentation will identify and briefly examine some of the principal concerns that are sometimes raised in relation to land-use planning. This discussion will highlight a series of questions such as . How can planning strike the appropriate balance between providing certainty and remaining .current.? What criteria should be applied when determining the appropriate level of effort and detail for planning exercises? How can planning regimes accommodate significant unanticipated events (e.g., discovery of diamonds in northern Canada)? How can planning processes achieve satisfactory results within reasonable time frames and budgets? What are the appropriate approval processes for land-use plans? How should planning be integrated with other stages of decision-making (e.g., the determination of broad policy directions and priorities for land-use and resource management, rights issuance, environmental assessment, etc.)? How can the need for flexibility mechanisms and feedback loops be addressed in planning processes? Time permitting, this portion of the presentation will include an opportunity for workshop participants to raise issues relating to the design and implementation of planning processes, comment on issues raised by others, and identify lessons drawn from practical experience with land-use planning.

The third part of this presentation will focus on planning tools and processes that could be used to achieve the objectives identified in part one and address the concerns raised in part 2. Planning tools that to be examined include land-use zoning, ecological objectives, limits on total impacts (e.g., linear disturbance), limits on intensity of land-use (e.g., access management), phasing of development in different regions, etc. It would also be useful to consider how planning processes can be adapted to the particular values, issues and circumstances in the regions where they are undertaken. The use of flexibility mechanisms . such as procedures for approving non-conforming uses and amending plans . may also be discussed in general terms. The legal, institutional and policy underpinnings that are required if planning is to be an effective component of IRM could also be explored. It will obviously be impossible to examine the full range of options or to undertake a detailed analysis of specific planning tools and processes. The objective here is simply to frame the issues and suggest options and lines of inquiry. This stage of the presentation would lead into a more comprehensive and detailed discussion of these topics in subsequent sessions.

 

Land Use Planning in British Columbia: 10-Years of Solving Wicked Problems

Kevin Kriese, Regional Director, Government of British Columbia, Sustainable Resource Management, Skeena Region , Bag 5000, Smithers, BC, V0J 2N0, Tel: ( 250) 847-7546, Fax: (250) 847-7643,

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Throughout the 1980's and 1990's, British Columbia was embroiled in constant land use battles. In 1992, the government embraced a comprehensive program of land use planning, using consensus-seeking processes, to resolve the conflicts. In the subsequent decade, planning has been completed for nearly 75% of the province, and most of the remaining plans will be complete in the next two years.

In many respects, the program has been a spectacular success. Most of the conflicts of the past have been resolved, and when new ones erupt (which is inevitable) there is a path to resolution. However, land use planning has also been criticized as being too slow, being incomplete, lacking a basis in science, detracting from economic development and ultimately not providing the certainty that was desired.

This presents a paradox; land use planning has been both a success and a failure. The paradox can be understood by examining the nature of the problems being solved. The presentation proposes that land use planning is a "wicked problem", and that conventional problem solving approaches are not effective. BC's experience demonstrates that "Peace in the Woods" will only be achieved by building (or re-building) social consensus regarding public resources.

 


Economic Opportunities and Ecological Integrity: Approaches to Balancing Risk for Resource Managers

Brad Stelfox, Forest Ecologist, Forem Technologies, Box 805, Bragg Creek, Alberta, T0L 0K0, Tel: (403) 949-3008, Fax: (403) 949-2663, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

When presented with landuse development opportunities (mining, forestry, energy, agriculture) that improve regional economic performance (employment, income, royalties, tax base), resource managers and politicians must objectively evaluate various industrial development trajectories against a broad suite of societal indicators.

In regions where environmental quality is high and is a major contributor to current lifestyles and landuses (hunting, fishing, trapping, tourism), policy makers and resource managers considering landuse options have the unenviable task of evaluating both short-term and long-term risk to various social, economic and ecological indicators. Such is the case for the Yukon, where landuse policies developed and implemented during this decade will have profound consequences (both favorable and adverse) to the next several generations of Yukoners. If you were charged with the responsibility of making wise landuse policy, and were standing at the intersection where the road branches to many different paths (each representing different landuse development scenarios), how would you objectively evaluate your options, and thereby navigate a road that most effectively delivers a favorable "future" to Yukoners.

To effectively project the opportunities and consequences of different landuse options, managers turn to computer simulation models to assist them in gaining insights to the future landscape. Although these models do not "predict" the future in an exact sense, they do provide an invaluable service in quantifying "relative risk" of different landuse development scenarios.

Drawing on several examples from the province of Alberta, this presentation will examine how the ALCES landscape simulation model has been deployed on large regional landscape where diverse stakeholder groups require guidance on the likely outcomes of various landuse options. A recurrent outcome of regional landuse assessment initiatives is the recognition that considerable management flexibility and broad stakeholder "buy-in" awaits those managers who embrace strategic level assessments early in the resource allocation process. In contrast, conducting regional assessments after most landuse decisions have been made, often leads to an equal recognition of opportunities and risk of landuse scenarios, but very limited ability to mitigate problems and solve complex multi-stakeholder issues.

In comparison to many other regional jurisdictions, the Yukon is still at the cross-roads of landuse paths, and has a broad range of options in terms of landuse trajectories. Understanding the social, economic, and environmental opportunities and risks of each possible landuse trajectory should be given highest priority.

 


Tough Decisions for Northern Fishermen: You Can.t Have Your Fish and Eat Them, Too

Michael Sullivan, Fisheries Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Division, Sustainable Resource Development, 7th Flr., O.S. Longman Building, 6909 - 116 St., Edmonton, AB, T6H 4P2, Tel: (780) 422-3409, Fax: (780) 422-9685, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Northern fishes, such as arctic grayling, lake trout and northern pike, are slow-growing and spawn at old ages. Fishing can be great, but sustainable rates of harvest are a tiny fraction of what southern, high-productive fisheries can support. These characteristics make northern lakes and rivers very vulnerable to over-fishing, even by what most people believe is light fishing pressure (e.g., fly-in or snowmobile-in fishermen). As industrial development increased in northern Alberta, roads and winter trails gave fishermen easy access to previously remote fisheries. These once high-quality fisheries declined rapidly. Alberta.s dilemma in the biological reality of combining industry and northern ecosystems is simple: many people fishing and few fish for the kill. Each increase in industrial development clearly and immediately results in additional restrictions on all fisheries (sport, commercial, and First Nations subsistence). At some of Alberta.s low productivity lakes, even catch-and-release-only has resulted in too many dead fish. In northern fisheries, such as in the Yukon and NWT, critical thresholds between development, fishing, and maintaining surviving aquatic ecosystems are even lower than in Alberta. Northern fishermen must make tough decisions such as "Poor fishing for all, or good fishing for a few .lottery-winners.?, Big fish and few licences, or many licences and few, small fish?", "Catch and release for all, or some harvest for a select few?", "Good roads and closed fisheries, or no roads and open fisheries?". These decisions affect First Nations fishermen, lodge operators, resident sport fishermen, and commercial fishermen. Tough choices must be made before industrial development occurs, before the fisheries decline, and before fisherman have no choices left.

 

Cumulative Effects in Yukon

Rob Walker, Environment Directorate

, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, 345-300 Main St. Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5, Tel: (867) 667-3857, Fax: (867) 667-3216, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This talk will introduce the concepts of cumulative effects. What are cumulative effects? Why do we need to pay attention to them? Cumulative effects occur on many scales from simple and understandable to unfathomably complex. Cumulative effects can affect small areas and single resources or can affect large regions and global systems. In his talk, Mr. Walker will review the main classes of cumulative effects including; incremental disturbance, growth inducing development and synergetic effects with a focus on their occurrence in Yukon. The talk will identify how cumulative effects arising from unplanned development in Yukon could interact to potentially limit other desirable development opportunities. The talk reaffirms the understanding that the management of cumulative effects is essential to promoting sustainable development. To broaden out the understanding of cumulative effects, workshop participants will be called on to identify where they think cumulative effects are occurring in Yukon.

 


Backgrounds of Speakers

 

Terry Antoniuk

, P.Biol, R.P.Bio., the Principal of Salmo Consulting Inc., is a Professional Biologist registered in the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia. He has more than twenty five years experience in biological studies and research, environmental assessment and mitigation, and public involvement in federal, provincial, and territorial jurisdictions across Canada, and internationally. One of Terry.s specialties is cumulative aquatic and terrestrial effects. He is currently working with government, non-profit and industry sectors to develop cumulative effects assessment and management tools in northeast British Columbia, the oil sands region of northeast Alberta, and the Rocky Mountain foothills.

 

Ron Cruikshank

is the Director of the Yukon Land Use Planning Council (YLUPC). He has 13 years of professional planning experience in northern Canada, including a Heritage River Planner for the Canadian Heritage River designation of the Arctic Red River, a Park Planner for the Gwich.in Territorial Park, and the Land Use Planner for the Gwich.in Land Use Planning Board in the Mackenzie Delta region. For the past four years through the YLUPC, he has assisted and coordinated the implementation of Chapter 11 of the Umbrella Final Agreement, Land Use Planning. With several land claims now being settled, active planning is beginning to occur in four Yukon planning regions, requiring both government-to-government and community-level involvement. Through his professional experience, he has become familiar with regional planning under both the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act (MVRMA) and the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. Ron received his Master of Arts (Geography) from the University of Waterloo in 1990.

 

Dr. Frank Duerden

is a professor in the School of Applied Geography at Ryerson University, and Associate graduate faculty at the University of Guelph. He has long standing interest and practical experience in the field of land and resource issues in northern and rural regions. In the 1980.s he directed the Yukon First Nations Mapping Project, identifying economic opportunities associated with settlement lands throughout the Yukon and introducing Geographic Information systems (GIS) to Yukon First Nations. Subsequently he was closely associated with the land claim process, including a central role in drafting the Land Use Planning chapter of the Yukon Umbrella Final Agreement (UFA), and the development of the initial DAP framework agreement. He was involved in identifying and prioritizing land-use planning regions in the Yukon and acted as advisor to the Council of Yukon First Nations in the Kluane land-use planning process.

He has advised a number of First Nations on a wide range of land and resource issues, and worked on land claims, land-use planning and environmental assessment in British Columbia. Associated experience includes Maori resource rights in New Zealand, land-use planning in northern Russia and as the director of the Indigenous Land Use Information Project examining the role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) in planning. He has written on sustainable development in northern Canada, northern land use planning, land-claims and economic development, and applications of TEK.

 

 

 

 


Jesse Duke

is Director, Mineral Planning and Development, at Energy, Mines and Resources with the Yukon Government. He is a Geologist, and has worked with the Yukon Government since 1994. Previously he worked in the exploration industry throughout the north, and mostly in the Yukon. He has a Bachelors Degree in Geology from the University of Alaska.

 

Lyn Hartley

(M.A., B.Sc., CCR) is a convener of strategic conversations. Since 1991, Lyn has worked in the environmental field across the North in the Yukon, NWT and Nunavut. Currently, she does policy work for DIAND's Environment Directorate as well as consults in the areas of facilitation, coaching, strategic planning and conflict resolution. Her personal purpose is to help groups figure out the questions that really matter. She has a penchant for velour, laughter, google.ca and a codependent relationship with her dog, Wulf.

 

George Hegmann,

is an engineer and senior environmental scientist with AXYS Environmental Consulting Ltd. in Calgary, specializing in environmental impact assessment (EIA) and cumulative effects assessment (CEA) process and implementation. He has conducted numerous assessments under regulatory review, recommended methodological approaches for assessing and managing cumulative effects and frameworks for managing cumulative effects for various federal and provincial departments, provided guidance to assessing cumulative effects for recreational and energy projects in western and northern Canada, and has conducted numerous workshops on CEA and EIA.

 

Bonnie Hurlock

is the Executive Director of the Teslin Regional Land Use Planning Commission. The Commission was established in August 2002 with the mandate to develop and recommend a regional land use plan to the governments of Yukon, Canada and the affected First Nations. Bonnie has been living and working in the Yukon for over 20 years. She first came to the Yukon to work for the Northern Affairs Program developing policy for the Northern Land Use Planning program and later became involved in the Greater Kluane Land Use Plan. She worked on land use planning issues and Chapter 11 for the Council of Yukon First Nations. She has extensive experience in First Nations relations/community development and has managed the Teslin Tlingit Council and Kwanlin Dun First Nation. Recently, she worked for the Yukon Land Claims & Implementation Secretariat and represented the Yukon government on the multi-party Implementation Working Group to complete the five-year implementation review of the first four Yukon First Nations land claims agreements. Prior to coming to the Yukon, she worked for many years in the field of regional land use planning in Alberta.

 

Heidi Istchenko

is the Yukon Region Director for the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC). The YRITWC is a grassroots indigenous organization that acts as a coordinating body to help First Nations and Tribes build capacity among their communities in order to protect the integrity of the Yukon River Watershed.

Heidi is a born and raised Yukoner and has worked for the past 7 years with rural Yukon communities and First Nation governments using a community based management and capacity  - building approach. She has a solid and credible background in northern renewable resource management and their associated planning processes (wildlife, fish, forestry, and lands), specifically working within the guidelines of Chapters 16 & 17 of the Yukon First Nations Final Agreements. Her experience and success in working with northern communities using a capacity building approach resulted in an invitation to author and present a case study on the topic of capacity building at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, South Africa.

 


Steven A. Kennett

is a Research Associate at the Canadian Institute of Resources Law in Calgary. He holds a B.A. (Hon.) in Politics and Economics from Queen's University, an M.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University, an LL.B. from the University of Toronto and an LL.M. from Queen's University.

Mr. Kennett's areas of research and publication include environmental assessment, public land management, environmental law and policy, energy regulation, constitutional law, federal-provincial relations and interjurisdictional water resource management. Mr. Kennett has been editor of the Canada Energy Law Service (Alberta) since 1992. He is also is the author of Managing Interjurisdictional Waters in Canada: A Constitutional Analysis (CIRL, 1991) and the editor of a collection of essays on Law and Process in Environmental Management (CIRL, 1993). Mr. Kennett.s recent publications include papers examining cumulative effects management, public land law and policy, constitutional jurisdiction over pipeline regulation in Canada, and the federal-provincial harmonization process for environmental regulation. He was the principal author of CIRL.s Independent Review of the BHP Diamond Mine Process (DIAND, 1997) and the sole author of a report entitled Issues and Options for a Policy on Impact and Benefits Agreements for the Northern Territories (DIAND, 1999). His most recent monograph is A Guide to Impact and Benefits Agreements (CIRL, 1999).

Mr. Kennett has conducted contract work for a range of organizations including the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND), Natural Resources Canada, Alberta Environmental Protection, Alberta Energy, the Environment Council of Alberta, the Government of the Northwest Territories (Department of Resources, Wildlife and Economic Development), Saskatchewan Intergovernmental Affairs, the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy, the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation, the Mackenzie River Basin Board, the Northern River Basins Study, the International Development Research Centre, and the Natural Resources Conservation Board of Alberta. He has also received research funding from the Alberta Law Foundation and from the BIOCAP Canada Foundation.

 

Bill Klassen

has been actively involved in natural resource management issues in the Yukon for over twenty-five years. He has participated in the environmental assessment of a number of major northern resource development projects, including the Diavik Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories and the recently revived Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline project. He is currently the chair of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region Environmental Impact Screening Committee. Bill has also facilitated a number of workshops and conferences on natural resources. A former deputy minister of the Yukon Department of Renewable Resources, he holds a degree in wildlife management from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a Master of Forestry degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Kevin Kriese

is Regional Director, Skeena Region, Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management in Smithers, British Columbia. Kevin is a Registered Professional Forester and has a Masters Degree of Natural Resources Management. Kevin has worked for the Province of BC for more than 10 years with a focus on land use planning, first nations negotiations, and forest management. As process coordinator for the Kamloops Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP), he was involved in the first LRMP approved in the province. In the intervening years, he has provideed support to completion and implementation of five other LRMP's in north-west BC. Currently, Skeena Region of the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management is striving to complete two more LRMP's using a more streamlined process, with a goal of completing plans in less than two years.

 

Brad Stelfox

completed his B.Sc. (Zoology; University of Alberta) in 1980 and his Ph.D. (Wildlife Productivity; University of Alberta) in 1985. Brad's doctoral research focused on the ecological advantages of game ranching native ungulates in Kenya, East Africa. From 1982 to 1987, Brad served as senior faculty for the Kenya field campus of the School for Field Studies. From 1988 to 1991, Brad worked as the Research Director of the Teton Science School in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where he taught university field courses on fire ecology, snow ecology, and ungulate biology and management. In 1991, Brad became the Program Manager for the Wildlife Ecology Branch of the Alberta Environmental Centre where he led a research project examining the effects of forestry on biodiversity of boreal mixedwood communities.

In 1995, Dr. Stelfox established Forem Technologies, a small research and software firm that focuses on issues of sustainable resource management. Since the inception of Forem Technologies, Brad has focused his efforts on the development and implementation of the simulation model "ALCES" (A Landscape Cumulative Effects Simulator), a program gaining rapid acceptance as an effective tool for resource managers concerned with integration of the numerous landuses including forestry, the energy sector, agriculture, transportation, human settlements and various human recreational activities.

 

Michael Sullivan

A born-and-bred Albertan, Michael has spent his life fishing, hunting, and professionally "biologizing" in western and northern Canada. Years of guiding rich American fishermen in northern Saskatchewan showed Michael how easily northern lakes can be "fished out". For the past 2 decades, he has worked for the Alberta Fish & Wildlife Division as a fisheries biologist. His time is spent trying to atone for his (and his family.s) early years of over-fishing sins by doing the science and fisheries diplomacy behind province-wide, conservation-oriented fishing regulations.

 

Robert Walker

, brings 23 years experience working across the North. His primary area of expertise is environmental assessment and he has reviewed a number of mines, hydro projects, roads and other developments. He worked in the central arctic during the diamond staking and development rush which raised many concerns about cumulative effects. In parallel with the Panel review of the BHP Ekati diamond mine, Rob facilitated the design and establishment of a multi-stakeholder, interdisciplinary West Kitikmeot/Slave Study to identify potential information needs to assess and manage cumulative effects from future development in the region. Rob also lead development of a Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program for the Mackenzie Valley. During this period he participated in the development of cumulative effects methods for CEAA and the Environmental Assessment Administrators. Rob and his family settled in Yukon in 1998 and since then he has been conducting environmental assessment on various local projects.

 


Regional Land Use Planning and Cumulative Effects Management: Linkages and Applications

February 10 and 11, 2003 - Whitehorse, Yukon

Web page: www.planyukon.ca

 

Registration Form

To register please complete this form. Please print clearly and include your name and affiliation as you wish it to appear on your name badge and receipt for payment.

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Registration includes admission to the presentations and discussions on February 10 and 11, and lunch and refreshments on both days. Seating will be limited to 160 people so please register early.

Payment

:

Early Registration fee: $133.75 (including $8.75 GST) until January 31, 2003

Late Registration fee $214.00 (including $14.00 GST) after January 31, 2003

Payments should be made in full by cheque, money order or Mastercard payable to "Conventions North". Receipts will be issued for all registration fees paid. Mail payments to:

Conventions North c/o Deb Ryan

410 Hawkins Street

Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1X8

Fax: (867) 667-4940

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: I plan to attend the lunch on February 10, 2003 (YES or NO) and / or on February 11, 2003 (YES or NO).

Cancellation Policy

: 100 percent non-refundable after February 03, 2003. Registration fees will only be refunded if cancellation occurs prior to the February 03, 2003 deadline. Substitutions are permitted.

To register or for registration information please contact Deb Ryan at Tel: (867) 667-4943, Fax: (867) 667-4940, or E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.